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Cosmic Disclosure: The Original Rocket Man with David Adair

August 26, 2017

Season 8, Episode 2

As soon as the plane rolled up to our hangar, it stopped. Out came these guys, so help me, black suits, white shirts, little skinny black ties. Get closer to them, funny-looking triangle watch.”

* Cosmic Disclosure: David Adair Bio – Season 8, Episode 1
* Cosmic Disclosure: The Descent Into Area 51 with David Adair – Season 8, Episode 3

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David Wilcock: All right. Welcome back to “Cosmic Disclosure”. I’m your host, David Wilcock, and I’m here with David Adair.

So why don’t we start from the beginning, because you have a very significant story here. Take us through the story.

David Adair: Yeah, well a chain of events occurred while this was going on. My mother was a nurse, and she – this is 1966 – and she was in charge of a coronary care unit.

And my mother ran third shift from 11 to 7:00 in the morning. And she had this elderly patient, 95 years old, and his name is Irving. And the wife, Arizona, was there. And they had a son named Curtis that would come in about 3:00 a.m. in the morning to see him. Their last name is LeMay.

Wilcock: Ah! Ha, ha.

Adair: So this is Curtis LeMay’s parents.

Wilcock: Right.

Adair: My Mother was the CC technician, and since she is in charge of third shift, Curtis LeMay has to go through my mother to see his parents. So they became friends.

And he would show up at 3:00 in the morning because he’s like paparazzi, back in those years, I mean. You know, former head of the joint chiefs, designer of the B-52, founder of SAC, Strategic Air Command. Guy had a little bit of power.

Wilcock: Yeah.

Adair: So he got to know my mother, and they’d just talk, you know, personable guy. And he asked my mother, “What’s your family like?”

She said, “Well, I got my husband and three sons.” And then she goes, “These other two sons are only about a year apart. It’s pretty much normal,” but she goes, “that younger one, he’s a little bit different.”

And Curtis says, “How so?”

“He’s flying all these rockets out in the cattle fields. And they are really fast, and they’re big.”

And he said, “Well, how tall?”

And she goes, “Oh, they’re about twice my height.”

He goes, “Damn, that’s big. And he’s always writing stuff down.”

And that got Curtis’s attention. He goes, “He had stuff written in a book?”

“Yeah, he’s got this big notebook, about 93 pages of it.”

“Could you bring that and let me see it one night?”

So she brought it one night. I go to bed to get up to go to school, so I didn’t even know it was gone.

She comes back 7:00 in the morning, put it back down. I never even knew it was missing.

Wilcock: Oh, wow!

Adair: So Curtis looks at it. He starts flipping through it, and he’s a pretty smart guy himself. And he’s going, “Man!”

He turned around to my mother and said, “You don’t have a copier do you?”

Wilcock: Ha, ha.

Adair: And he copied about a third. Thank God he didn’t copy the whole thing. But he copied about a third of it, and he took it to about an hour and a half way from home, to Battelle Memorial. That’s a big think tank.

Wilcock: What was in the books that caught his eye? Were you just taking notes from these 1,800 books in the library that you’d read?

Adair: No. To do what I was wanting to do, I’d have to make everything new from scratch. So I extrapolated information as a base point, and then I started my own math. And I went into electromagnetic fusion containment.

Wilcock: For space travel?

Adair: Yeah, for containment of a sun, electromagnetic fields. So Curtis took those pages he copied to Battelle Memorial, and he asked them, “Is that just chicken scratch or something important?”

And their immediate reaction was, “Who is this? Where is this person that’s writing this?”

He said, “Some kid launching rockets out in cow fields.”

And they go, “My God!”

So LeMay asked, “Is it real?”

They said, “Yeah. We’d like to meet him.”

And that’s when things started with LeMay.

Wilcock: So LeMay and his people started to think that you might actually have developed a way to contain electromagnetic fusion. Now, was that not being done at the time? And what’s the payoff if that works?

Adair: There were some people working on some stuff, Los Alamos. But what LeMay saw was that, according to Battelle, I was on the right track, and I was definitely closing in on it. And they just were kind of flabbergasted that I wasn’t at some institution or agency working with whatever.

And to LeMay, his brain was going in something else. So what he smelled was a coup here that he could pull, and that is he would fund me for everything I need, and he would end up with something that he was dearly looking for, which was speed. He was looking for enormous speed, because he had a term that I’ve never heard before in ’71, it’s called “first strike”.

Wilcock: Right.

Adair: So I just thought, “Well, you’re a kid. You’re 15 years old, and somebody is willing to give you everything that you need?” Come on, you going to jump on it. You’re not going to say “No”. I don’t think so.

Wilcock: Right.

Adair: And there’s been some critics that says, “You couldn’t pull this off in a garage by yourself.”

You’re absolutely right. I needed everybody. And this guy, with his power and his background – although he was a civilian, it does not matter in his power – he had the entire Iron Triad working for him, which is the commercial, and the military-industrial complex.

So we had people working with us. We’d sub parts out that we need, and machine stuff. So I had people like National Livermore Laboratories at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Battelle Memorial. The list just goes on and on.

And LeMay was very shrewd. We would break things up into small units, and send them out, farm them out. So when the person’s working on a device for us, [he is] not really sure what it is. It might be some kind of propulsion thing, or this might be regulating a flow.

You couldn’t put it together unless you had all the parts. And that was very smart of him.

So when everything came back to our building, our assembly lab, I put everything together. And there was a lot of personnel – hundreds of people working.

So it took us 26 and a half months. I’d go to school, get off the bus in the afternoon, and all these people were at this big garage lab that I had. And I had asked LeMay to get everybody out of their uniforms and wear blue jeans and plaid shirts, so they’d blend in with the locals, ’cause I’m trying to live a normal life here.

And he said, “Oh, man, that’s perfect. It’s like covert.”

And I went, “What’s covert?”

He’s, ‘Never mind. Just keep on going.”

And I wouldn’t talk . . . try not to talk about much at school, but the kids knew that there was something going on with me.

Wilcock: So what did LeMay tell you the goal was of what you were doing for him?

Adair: What he wanted was . . . he said, “I want the same thing you want, David.”

And I said, “Oh, you want an electromagnetic fusion containment fire plant.”

And he goes, “Yeah, that’s what I want.”

“Well, let’s see what we can do to get it.”

And he knew for me to test my fuel, the best thing to test it in is a rocket body, which is exactly what he wanted.

So Colonel Bailey Arthur Williams was the XO for General LeMay. And he was there on site every day. I never saw LeMay. It was just Colonel Williams.

Once we got done, we were ready. It was completed after 26 months. And now we’re ready to put it in a truck and take it to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. And so we arrived there.

CONTINUE

From → World Watch

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